Marie Curie made major contributions to science

National Women’s History Month started March 1 and will continue until March 31. The month is dedicated to recognizing the contributions that women who made history.  “Mustangs Ahead” would like to recognize women who have made a huge impact on today’s society.

Cassidy McLellan- Mustangs Ahead

Marie Curie was an award winning science

(LAKEWOOD RANCH, FL)-  One woman from the past worthy of Mustangs’ recognition is Marie Sklodowska Curie. Curie discovered radioactivity and invented a portable X-Ray machine that was used during World War 1.

Curie was born in Warsaw, Poland and received a general education in her local schools, along with some scientific training from her father.

She left her hometown for Paris to continue her studies at the Sorbonne where she obtained a certification in Physics and Mathematical Sciences. This is where she met her husband, Pierre Curie, who was a professor at the School of Physics.

According to The Nobel Prize, “Curie, quiet, dignified and unassuming, was held in high esteem and admiration by scientists throughout the world. She was a member of the Conseil du Physique Solvay from 1911 until her death and since 1922 she had been a member of the Committee of Intellectual Co-operation of the League of Nations.”

Curie became the first woman to win a Nobel Prize and the first person to ever win two Nobel Prizes.

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According to Science History Institute, “Marie Sklodowska Curie (1867–1934) was the first person ever to receive two Nobel Prizes: the first in 1903 in physics, shared with Pierre Curie (her husband) and Henri Becquerel for the discovery of the phenomenon of radioactivity, and the second in 1911 in chemistry for the discovery of the radioactive elements polonium and radium.”

LRHS chemistry teacher Tammy Harper encouraged all people, regardless of gender, to take an interest in science.

“I think that the greater diversity in the population of scientists that are researching, the better the results will be,” she said.

Curie made remarkable discoveries and deserves to be recognized during National Women’s History Month.